Taiwan Tati Cultural and Educational Foundation

 
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home The News

News

Health minister resigns over premium dispute

E-mail Print PDF

Department of Health Minister Yaung Chih-liang (楊志良) tendered his resignation in a shock move yesterday, saying he could not fulfill Premier Wu Den-yih’s (吳敦義) request that 75 percent of the insured be exempted from a proposal to increase national health insurance premiums.

Wu rejected Yaung’s resignation late last night, however. Executive Yuan spokesman Johnny Chiang (江啟臣) said the premier hoped Yaung would stay in the position.

Read more...
 

China sees bank risks in local-government financing

E-mail Print PDF

Chinese central bank Governor Zhou Xiaochuan (周小川) said that local-government financing vehicles using land as collateral may pose risks for the nation’s banks.

“When land prices rise, there may be over-valuation of land,” Zhou said at a press briefing in Beijing yesterday. “In the future, if land prices fall, there may be a difference in the assessment of the loan.”

Read more...
 

Falun Gong stages anti-CCP march

E-mail Print PDF

About 2,000 Falun Gong ­practitioners staged a march in Taipei City yesterday in support of the nearly 70 million people they claim have dropped out of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) since 2005.

Holding banners that read “support China’s human rights = support Taiwan’s freedom” and “only with the disintegration of the CCP can the persecution be stopped,” demonstrators gathered on Ketagalan Boulevard to denounce criminal acts allegedly carried out by the Chinese authoritarian regime against Falun Gong practitioners, including harvesting organs from living people.

Read more...
 

No change in policy on arms sales: US

E-mail Print PDF

The US and China completed a series of top-level talks on arms sales to Taiwan, with Washington refusing to give Beijing any assurances that the sales would be stopped or curtailed, a US official said on Thursday.

“The US responded to PRC [People’s Republic of China] concerns over Taiwan by reiterating that it has followed a consistent approach,” State Department spokesman Philip Crowley said.

Read more...
 

Ex-MAC official urges Ma to rethink ECFA

E-mail Print PDF

A cross-strait expert yesterday expressed concern over the government’s plan to sign an economic cooperation framework agreement (ECFA) with Beijing, urging President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) to suspend negotiations on the trade pact and seek public consensus on Taiwan’s global economic strategy.

Former Mainland Affairs Council (MAC) deputy chairman Tung Chen-yuan (童振源) said the ECFA had four flaws.

Read more...
 

Beijing issues new warnings on Tibet and Taiwan

E-mail Print PDF

China yesterday launched a new warning to other countries not to interfere in its affairs in Tibet and Taiwan.

Washington irked Beijing in January when it approved the sale of a US$6.4 billion package of arms to Taiwan, and then again a month later when US President Barack Obama met the Dalai Lama at the White House.

Read more...
 

KMT’s election woes continue as party suffers more defeats in council elections

E-mail Print PDF

The Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) was dealt another round of setbacks at the local level yesterday after it lost a number of seats that were contested in 17 councilor speaker and vice speaker elections, while three councilors supported by the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) were elected.

The KMT nominated 10 council speakers and eight were elected. In vice speaker elections, the party nominated eight and five were elected.

Read more...
 


Page 127 of 147

Newsflash


Hundreds of thousands of protesters joined the annual 01 July rally from Victoria Park to Central calling for `one person, one vote` and universal suffrage for the 2017 chief executive election, marking the 16th anniversary of Hong Kong`s handover to Chinese rule after 156 years of British administration.
Photo: EPA

Tens of thousands of protesters, some waving British imperial flags and denouncing Chinese “colonists,” marched through torrential rain in Hong Kong yesterday to clamor for universal suffrage on the 16th anniversary of the territory’s return to Chinese rule.

Tropical Storm Rumbia brought a drenching and strong winds to the march, now an annual outpouring of discontent directed at both China’s communist government and the semi-autonomous territory’s local leadership.