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Public confidence in Ma slides

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Public trust in President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) continued to drop this month, along with those of his party and Premier Wu Den-yih (吳敦義), a poll released by the Global Views Survey Research Center indicated yesterday.

Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) Chairperson Tsai Ing-wen’s (蔡英文) confidence index, on the other hand, stayed above 50 for the fourth consecutive month, the poll showed.

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Internet firms in China pull back

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Two US companies that sell Internet addresses to Web sites said on Wednesday they had stopped registering new domain names in China because the Chinese government has begun demanding pictures and other identification documents from their customers.

One of the domain name companies, Go Daddy Inc, announced its change in policy at a congressional hearing that was largely devoted to Google Inc’s announcement on Monday that it will no longer censor Internet search results in China.

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Groups petition Obama to help Taiwan

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A large group of Taiwanese American organizations is petitioning US President Barack Obama to dramatically increase the US’ ability to stop a Chinese military takeover of Taiwan.

Over the past three months, the group has collected 17,000 letters of support from Taiwan, Japan, Canada and across the US.

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Fifty Tibetans allegedly caught over info leaks

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Since the unrest in Tibet in March 2008, as many as 50 Tibetans have been arrested for sending reports, photos or videos abroad, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) said in a report on Monday. In some cases, those arrests resulted in long jail sentences.

The latest conviction, the group said, involved a Netizen called “Dasher” who received a 10-year prison sentence on charges of “separatism” for sending reports and photos of the protests.

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Google shifts China engine to HK

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Google’s partial withdrawal from the China market yesterday brought swift condemnation from the government while leaving Chinese Web surfers to wonder whether they would be able to access a new offshore search engine site or be blocked by censors.

Google’s decision to move most of its China-based search functions to Hong Kong opened a new phase in a two-month-long fracas pitting the world’s most powerful Internet company against a government that tightly restricts the Web in the planet’s most populous market.

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US beef, ECFA polarizes public on political lines

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The attitudes of pan-green and pan-blue supporters toward the economic cooperation framework agreement (ECFA) the government wants to sign with China and renegotiation of a agreement with the US on US beef imports were likely to be as polarized as their political beliefs, a poll expert said yesterday.

Tsai Chia-hung (蔡佳泓), an associate research fellow at National Chengchi University’s Election Study Center, said his study showed that pan-blue supporters were likely to support an ECFA and oppose holding new rounds of negotiations on the relaxation of restrictions on US beef and beef products. Their position on the two issues, however, would not be as firm as their pan-green counterparts, Tsai said.

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Chinese media pans Google and alleges US intelligence links

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Chinese media unleashed a torrent of criticism against Google on Saturday after reports it would leave the country, with Xinhua news agency alleging that the company was linked to US intelligence.

The comments were the latest in a series of angry exchanges sparked by the row over the Internet giant’s complaints of cyber hacking and censorship in the country.

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Newsflash


A Republic of China Navy submarine is moored at the Zuoying naval base in Kaohsiung’s Zuoying District as a warship stands in the background during a visit by President Tsai Ing-wen on March 21 last year.
Photo: Chang Chung-i, Taipei Times

The indigenous submarine program has all the signs of becoming another multibillion-dollar scandal tarnished by graft and shady deals, with shadowy figures establishing shell companies to procure the contracts, including some who were involved in the Lafayette frigate scandal of the 1990s, insiders said yesterday.