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Taipei Times


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# Article Title Author Hits
61 CCP, KMT colluding to impede Taiwan Paul Lin 林保華 57
62 ‘White Wolf’ as post-truth news Taipei Times Editorial 65
63 Taiwanese must find the best way to transition Chen Yi-shen 陳儀深 44
64 The actions of a rogue nation must be stopped Paul Lin 林保華 44
65 The quiet change of Japan’s policy Masahiro Matsumura 88
66 Shedding skins show true colors of diehards James Wang 王景弘 54
67 Taiwan must be tougher with China Taipei Times Editorial 65
68 Localization of education Taipei Times Editorial 65
69 Flag affair shows Ko’s ideals have been ditched LIOU JE-WEI 劉哲瑋 58
70 The missed power of a name Taipei Times Editorial 61
71 Nation’s name historically justified Taipei Times Editorial 59
72 China and India face challenging times ahead Joseph Tse-hei Lee 李榭熙 68
73 Hung needs to read up on history Gerrit van der Wees 54
74 Taiwanese not fooled by Xi Taipei Times Editorial 49
75 Corporate culture repressing Taiwan Taipei Times Editorial 66
76 The Achilles’ heel of PRC and ROC Peter Chen 陳正義 60
77 Nation’s security weakness exposed Liberty Times Editorial 53
78 Guam, Taiwan’s brother in arms Huang Tien-lin 黃天麟 61
79 Power errors not nuclear disaster Tsai Ya-ying 蔡雅瀅 49
80 Resist ‘Chinese Taipei City’ agenda Liberty Times Editorial 50
 
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Newsflash

A conference on “International Organizations and Taiwan” was told on Monday that President Ma Ying-jeou’s (馬英九) efforts to increase Taipei’s international space had only limited success.

“China has not only withheld support for further expansion of Taiwan’s international space, it has also continued long-standing efforts to squeeze Taiwan’s international space,” said Bonnie Glaser, a senior fellow with the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

The conference, organized by the Washington-based Brookings Institution, heard that during Ma’s first year in office Beijing showed some “diplomatic flexibility,” but that more recently there had been no major progress.