Taiwan Tati Cultural and Educational Foundation

 
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Taiwan Tati Cultural and Educational Foundation

Control Yuan’s dubious arguments

While the legitimacy of the Control Yuan filing a request for a constitutional interpretation of the Act Governing the Handling of Ill-gotten Properties by Political Parties and Their Affiliate Organizations (政黨及其附隨組織不當取得財產處理條例) is questionable, there are several questionable elements in its report on the constitutionality of the law.

The Control Yuan on Tuesday made public the report, which was the basis for its request for an interpretation by the Council of Grand Justices.

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Taipei court says Ma not guilty of leaks


Judge Liao Chien-yu answers reporters’ questions at the Taipei District Court yesterday after the court found former president Ma Ying-jeou not guilty of leaking official secrets.
Photo: CNA

The Taipei District Court yesterday found former president Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) not guilty of libel and leaking of confidential information in the first ruling on a lawsuit filed by Democratic Progressive Party caucus whip Ker Chien-ming (柯建銘).

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Hong Kong’s ‘bird-cage democracy’

A democratic election should be fair and transparent, and exhibit the element of surprise and unpredictability. This component of an unexpected outcome excites citizens and makes electoral campaigns so appealing. This is certainly true for all elections in Taiwan since the end of the White Terror era (1947 to 1987).

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Stanton worried about Trump-Xi meet


From left, former deputy minister of foreign affairs Michael Kau, National Sun Yat-sen University professor Lin Wen-cheng and former American Institute in Taiwan director William Stanton, yesterday sit on a panel at a forum in Taipei hosted by the Taiwan Forever Association and the International Committee for a Democratic Taiwan.
Photo: Huang Yao-cheng, Taipei Times

US President Donald Trump’s unpredictability makes him “kind of afraid” of what might happen if Trump’s reported meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping (習近平) next month in the US occurs, former American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) director William Stanton said yesterday.

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Films and TV must tell Taiwanese war stories

Every year when the anniversary of the 228 Incident approaches, the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) becomes protective of Chiang Kai-shek (蔣介石). Its lack of reflection leaves the feeling that there is still a bit to go before Taiwan’s democratization process is complete.

One of the reasons put forward by those who refuse to reflect on the old dictator is that transitional justice is detrimental to the economy.

This point of view is unacceptable.

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Respect integrity of Aboriginal land

The history of Taiwan has been shaped by successive violent invasions: China’s Qing Dynasty, the empire of Japan and the Republic of China are examples of foreign powers that plundered Taiwan, leaving it damaged and its people scarred.

The passing of time presents an opportunity for yesterday’s “outsiders” to become today’s “insiders.”

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We're 228 Followers

2015-12-26 Taiwanese Shrine Initation & Marytr-Spirit Enshrine Ceremony
2014-02-28 228 Tâi-uân-sîn(Taiwan gods) Thanksgiving Blessing Assembly and Trong R. Chai Tâi-uân-sîn Thanksgiving Praying Ceremony
2013-08-18 Holy Mountain Holiness Birthday and Tâi-uân-sîn Lin Mao-sheng Statue's Placement Ceremony
2013-02-28 228 Tâi-uân-sîn Thanksgiving Prayer Assembly - Realized the Determination of Founding Taiwan State with Democratic Power
228 Memorial and Bian Casters Gathering on Feb. 28th, 2010
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Newsflash

After almost 700 days in detention, former president Chen Shui-bian (陳水扁) would not flee the country if he were released, he says in a new book that he wrote while incarcerated at the Taipei Detention Center.

“I choose to confront rather than escape,” he says, speaking of his legal troubles, including accusations that he committed forgery, embezzled state funds and laundered money through Swiss bank accounts.