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Home The News News Sweden, Taiwan hold first climate meeting in Madrid

Sweden, Taiwan hold first climate meeting in Madrid

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Environmental Protection Administration Minister Chang Tzi-chin, left, shakes hands with Mattias Frumerie, head of Sweden’s delegation to the 25th Conference of the Parties, on the sidelines of the conference in Madrid on Thursday.
Photo courtesy of the Representative Office of Taiwan in Sweden via CNA

Sweden on Thursday held its first bilateral talks on climate change with Taiwan at the 25th Conference of the Parties (COP25) in Madrid.

The meeting between Mattias Frumerie, head of Sweden’s delegation to COP25, and Environmental Protection Administration Minister Chang Tzi-chin (張子敬), was held on the sidelines of the conference.

Taiwan’s representative office in Sweden characterized the exchange as a show of support for Taiwan’s bid to join the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Although Taiwan remains excluded from UNFCCC meetings, as it is not a member of the UN and because Beijing has been trying to suppress its role in the international community, preventing it from participating in UN activities, Taipei sent a delegation to the COP25 meeting to share the nation’s experience in combating climate change.

The meeting came after nine Swedish parliamentarians, over the past two months, asked their government to take concrete action in support of Taiwan’s bid to join the UNFCCC as an observer, despite the two countries not having official diplomatic relations, Taiwan’s representative office in Sweden said.

Sweden has long been considered a leading country in combating climate change, it added.


Source: Taipei Times - 2019/12/16



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