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Home The News News Taiwanese groups meet Dalai Lama with invite

Taiwanese groups meet Dalai Lama with invite

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Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, prays for the victims of Typhoon Morakot, Hsiaolin village, Pingtung County, southern Taiwan August 31, 2009/file/Reuters
Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, prays for the victims of Typhoon Morakot, Hsiaolin village, Pingtung County, southern Taiwan August 31, 2009/file/Reuters

DHARAMSHALA, March 19: A group of Taiwanese religious representatives have requested the Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama to visit Taiwan, where his last visit was in 2009 to pray for the victims of Typhoon Morakot. The group on Monday presented before the Tibetan leader a joint invitation from 15 Taiwanese organizations at his residence here.
The Tibetan leader who turns 80 said he would be “extremely happy” to visit the island nation to meet his longtime Taiwanese friends. “[The visit] is possible, but I’m not so sure,” he was quoted as saying by CNA.

Tsai Huang-liang, Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) Legislator, asked the Taiwanese Premier Mao Chi-kuo during a question answer session in the Legislative Yuan in Taipei Tuesday if the government would issue a visa to the Tibetan leader.

Premier Mao Chi-kuo said he would take into account the “nation’s benefits as a whole” when taking decision whether to allow the Tibetan leader to visit Taiwan.

“The government would handle the case based on the principle of making sure [the visit] is in line with the benefits of Taiwanese, and handle it according to due regulations at a time and in a way that is acceptable to both parties,” Mao said.

“Who are the two parties? Taiwan and China?” Tsai asked, to which Mao said he meant Taiwan and the applicant.

Tsai demanded explanation as to why the government could not decide whether to welcome the spiritual leader when he had already said that he would be glad to come. “It would be a plus to Taiwan, as his visit would [symbolize] kindness, brightness, freedom and human rights; what damage would it incur to Taiwan? It is not like he would bring guns and cannons with him,” Tsai said.

Tsai accused the government for bowing to Chinese pressure and seeking Beijing’s approval for the Dalai Lama’s visit, an accusation that Mao dismissed.

The Tibetan spiritual leader visited Taiwan in 1997, 2001 and 2009. He was denied visa in 2012.

The Tibetan leader maintains that his visits should not harm ties between the country he is visiting and Beijing. “In any case, Taiwan should have very close and unique links with mainland China, but at the same time Taiwan also should enjoy democracy and prosperity,” he said in 2009 during a visit to Taiwan.


Source: Phayul.com



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