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Home Letters for Taiwan Letters to US President Barack Obama On Iran’s Protest over Alleged Vote-Rigging

On Iran’s Protest over Alleged Vote-Rigging

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Dear President Obama:

I am writing to express Tati Foundation’s concerns for the post-election protest in Iran.  Freedom of speech and human rights have always been our Foundation’s core values.  And a fair election is among the favorites that we champion.

As a leader of the world, we believe that the United States has the power, as well as the obligation to humanity, to be concerned over the events in Iran and to act as a sounding board of democracy.  Democracy cannot function without assurances for fair elections.  Democracy also cannot function properly if the people do not have the right to peaceful protests. 

As of June 15th, according to CNN, eight people died in this largest protest since Iran’s 1979 revolution.  This same report also indicates that currently media is being censored and journalists are in a crackdown.  A former vice president, Mohammad Ali Abtahi, who has the record of backing pro-reform candidates is also arrested.

All of these events concern us at Tati Foundation.  Our hearts and minds are with those who were sacrificed in the fight to obtain human rights for Iranians.  We hope that this protest will have positive impacts of democratization of Iran.

Sincerely,
Yi-Chang (Leo) Wang
Taiwan Tati Cultural and Educational Foundation


Note: Letter was written on Wednesday, June 17, 2009



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Last Updated ( Sunday, 05 July 2009 16:39 )  

Newsflash


Chen Guangcheng, second from left, walks with Kurt Campbell, U.S. assistant secretary of state, fourth from left, Gary Locke, U.S. Ambassador to China, third from left, and U.S. State Department legal adviser Harold Koh, left, in Beijing, China, on Wednesday.
Photo: Bloomberg

US President Barack Obama administration’s diplomatic predicament deepened yesterday, when a blind Chinese legal activist who took refuge in the US embassy said he now wants to go abroad, rejecting a deal that was supposed to keep him safely in China.

Only hours after Chen Guangcheng (陳光誠) left the embassy for a hospital checkup and reunion with his family, he began telling friends and foreign media they feel threatened and want to go abroad. At first taken aback at the reversal, the US State Department said officials spoke twice by phone with Chen and met with his wife, with both affirming their desire to leave.