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Taiwan Tati Cultural and Educational Foundation

Tired of KMT’s moronic stunts

Just when it seemed the Chinese Nationalist Party’s (KMT) presidential election campaign, with candidate Kaohsiung Mayor Han Kuo-yu (韓國瑜), could not become any more farcical, the party plumbs a new low with its orchestrated political stunt last week outside the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which quickly backfired and plunged Han’s campaign into fresh chaos.

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Reclaiming ‘one China’ narrative

The end of World War II brought the people of the former Japanese colony of Formosa no peace. Unlike all other colonial peoples who gained independence after the war, the US’ “one China” policy trapped them, in the words of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, in “political purgatory.” The policy also trapped the US in fear of a war with China.

It started in 1943, when the US in the Cairo Declaration promised Chiang Kai-shek (蔣介石) of the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) that “Formosa shall be restored to the Republic of China [ROC] after the war.”

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CIB detains 10 allegedly helping Chinese enter illegally


Passersby are reflected in the windows of the Taipei District Prosecutors’ Office yesterday.
Photo: Huang Chieh, Taipei Times

The Criminal Investigation Bureau (CIB) yesterday conducted raids on five locations in Taipei and New Taipei City, detaining 10 alleged members of an operation that took advantage of a legal loophole to enable more than 10,000 “tourists” to enter Taiwan over the past three years, including Chinese government officials and spies.

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Polls are not Han’s concern; it is money

Kaohsiung Mayor Han Kuo-yu (韓國瑜), the Chinese Nationalist Party’s (KMT) presidential candidate, is doing worse and worse in opinion polls.

Seeing that the top two candidates have swapped places in the polls and that the gap between them is widening, Han’s fans suspect that survey results are being fabricated by the pollsters.

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The Formosa Incident: a look back

This week, Taiwan is remembering that 40 years ago, on Dec. 10, 1979, the Formosa Incident, also known as the Kaohsiung Incident, took place.

Most people are familiar with what happened: Democracy leaders associated with Formosa Magazine organized a Human Rights Day rally in Kaohsiung. The event resulted in chaos when police surrounded the crowd and started to use tear gas.

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Hong Kong protests at half-year mark


Pro-democracy protesters march on a street in Hong Kong yesterday.
Photo: AP

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators yesterday crammed into Hong Kong’s streets, their chants echoing off high-rises, in a mass show of support for a protest movement that shows no signs of flagging as it enters a seventh month.

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We're 228 Followers

2015-12-26 Taiwanese Shrine Initation & Marytr-Spirit Enshrine Ceremony
2014-02-28 228 Tâi-uân-sîn(Taiwan gods) Thanksgiving Blessing Assembly and Trong R. Chai Tâi-uân-sîn Thanksgiving Praying Ceremony
2013-08-18 Holy Mountain Holiness Birthday and Tâi-uân-sîn Lin Mao-sheng Statue's Placement Ceremony
2013-02-28 228 Tâi-uân-sîn Thanksgiving Prayer Assembly - Realized the Determination of Founding Taiwan State with Democratic Power
228 Memorial and Bian Casters Gathering on Feb. 28th, 2010
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Newsflash

The announcement earlier this week by US Ambassador to China Jon Huntsman that he was resigning from his post to seek the Republican Party’s nomination for the presidential election next year could have substantial implications for Washington’s Taiwan policy.

A billionaire and former governor of Utah, Huntsman was a Mormon missionary in Taiwan from 1987 to 1988 and is said to be fluent in Mandarin and Hoklo (also known as Taiwanese).