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Renewed calls for official government use of ‘China’

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Lawmakers and academics are calling on the government to refrain from using the term “mainland” in reference to China in official documents in an effort to put an end to the “one country, two areas” framework that the former Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) government had envisioned.

“China” has been an internationally recognized term used to refer to China by countries like the US and Japan, which do not call the country of 1.3 billion the “mainland,” New Power Party Legislator-at-large Hsu Yung-ming (徐永明) said.

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Xi might give Taiwan deadline: Bush

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Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang toast during a reception at the Great Hall of the People on the eve of the Oct. 1 National Day holiday in Beijing on Sept. 30.
Photo: AP

Chinese President Xi Jinping (習近平) might introduce a deadline for a resolution on Taiwan during the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China this month, according to former American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) chairman Richard Bush.

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Public to decide on territory: premier

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While voicing his support for constitutional change, Premier William Lai (賴清德) yesterday said that public consensus is critical to deciding whether the nation needs to redefine its territory.

“Society and the nation are progressing, and the Constitution should advance with the times,” Lai said in response to questions from Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) Legislator Jason Hsu (許毓仁) at the Legislative Yuan in Taipei.

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China mobilizing unification advocates

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Overseas Community Affairs Council head Wu Hsin-hsing speaks during a question-and-answer session at a meeting of the legislature’s Foreign and National Defense Committee in Taipei yesterday.
Photo: Chen Chih-chu, Taipei Times

Beijing has been mobilizing overseas political parties who advocate unification across the Taiwan Strait to visit Taiwanese political parties under the guise of economic exchanges, while “discouraging independence and promoting unification,” Overseas Community Affairs Council (OCAC) Minister Wu Hsin-hsing (吳新興) said yesterday.

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Taiwanese identity crucial to facing threat

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Former president Lee Teng-hui yesterday gives a speech at a seminar on national awareness held by the Presbyterian Church in Taiwan’s branch in Tainan.
Photo: CNA

To become a normal democracy, the nation has to build up its Taiwanese identity against Beijing’s threats from within and outside the nation, former president Lee Teng-hui (李登輝) said yesterday.

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‘Sing China’ organized by Taipei: NTU

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Workers dismantle the “Sing! China Music Festival” stage on the National Taiwan University athletics field on Monday last week, the day after the festival was canceled because of protests.
Photo: Wang Yi-sung, Taipei Times

The “Sing! China: Shanghai-Taipei Music Festival” was organized by the Taipei Department of Cultural Affairs and therefore not a commercial activity, National Taiwan University (NTU) said yesterday.

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 04 October 2017 05:08 ) Read more...
 

Groups appeal for clarification of Lee Ming-che’s status

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Members of the Taiwan Association for Human Rights, including secretary-general Chiu Ee-ling, second left, hold flowers at a news conference in Taipei yesterday.
Photo: Chang Chia-ming, Taipei Times

Worried that detained human rights advocate Lee Ming-che (李明哲) might have been sentenced in secret, civic groups and legislators yesterday urged the government to take immediate action to protect Lee’s right to appeal.

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Newsflash

Google’s partial withdrawal from the China market yesterday brought swift condemnation from the government while leaving Chinese Web surfers to wonder whether they would be able to access a new offshore search engine site or be blocked by censors.

Google’s decision to move most of its China-based search functions to Hong Kong opened a new phase in a two-month-long fracas pitting the world’s most powerful Internet company against a government that tightly restricts the Web in the planet’s most populous market.