Taiwan Tati Cultural and Educational Foundation

 
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home The News

News

Museum honors freedom advocate based in Japan

E-mail Print PDF

A bust of Ong Iok-tek is yesterday pictured at a Tainan memorial hall commemorating his life, work and dedication to the Taiwanese independence movement and the study of the Hoklo language (also known as Taiwanese).
Photo: Liu Wan-chun, Taipei Times

A museum dedicated to independence activist Ong Iok-tek (王育德) yesterday opened at his former residence in Tainan, where he lived with his elder brother Ong Iok-lim (王育霖).

Read more...
 

Memorial’s fate undecided

E-mail Print PDF

Transitional Justice Commission member Yang Tsui speaks at a news conference in Taipei yesterday.
Photo: Wang Yi-song, Taipei Times

A decision about the fate of the Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall in Taipei would be made before early next year, Transitional Justice Commission members said yesterday.

Read more...
 

Ex-president urges independence poll

E-mail Print PDF

Former president Chen Shui-bian gives a thumbs-up in Kaohsiung in an undated photograph.
Photo copied by Ke Yu-hao, Taipei Times

Taiwan must soon hold a referendum on the issue of independence, former president Chen Shui-bian (陳水扁) was quoted as saying by a Japanese daily in a front-page article yesterday.

Read more...
 

TSU accuses KMT of electoral crimes

E-mail Print PDF

The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) yesterday reported the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) and KMT Chairman Wu Den-yih (吳敦義) to prosecutors and accused them of forgery and breaching the Referendum Act (公民投票法) after the Central Election Commission on Thursday said that 1 percent of the signatures that the KMT submitted for three referendum proposals belonged to dead people.

Forging signatures for referendum petitions is a crime under Article 211 of the Criminal Code and Article 35 of the Referendum Act, TSU spokesman Yeh Chih-yuan (葉智遠) told a news conference outside the Taipei District Prosecutors’ Office yesterday.

Read more...
 

Residency cards a ‘Chinese ploy’

E-mail Print PDF

China-based Taiwanese businessman Cheng Po-yu, right, has his fingerprints taken while applying for a Chinese residence permit at a police station in Beijing’s Shijingshan District yesterday morning.
Photo: CNA

Beijing’s issuing of residency permit cards for people from Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau, which came into effect yesterday, is part of a ploy to bring Taiwan into China’s political fold, the Mainland Affairs Council said.

Read more...
 

Referendum submissions expected

E-mail Print PDF

Members of the Tokyo Olympics for Taiwan Name Rectification Action Working Group are pictured outside Douliou Train Station in Yunlin County on Aug. 15.
Photo: Chan Shih-hung, Taipei Times

Documentation supporting 20 referendum questions that have entered the second-stage signature drive are yet to be submitted to the Central Election Commission, with time running out before the Nov. 24 local elections, the commission said yesterday.

Read more...
 

French professor says Beijing stuck in wartime values

E-mail Print PDF

The loss of El Salvador as a diplomatic ally to China has confirmed that Chinese decisionmakers are far from adopting modern values of cooperation, tolerance and mutually beneficial gains, a French specialist in cross-strait relations said on Tuesday.

The way the Chinese decisionmakers deal with Taiwan and the Taiwan issue worldwide “remains entrenched in pre-Second World War [WW2] values of sheer force, brutal diplomacy, territorial conquest and crude national interests,” said Stephane Corcuff, a professor of political science at France’s Lyon University.

Read more...
 


Page 3 of 126

Newsflash

The office of former president Chen Shui-bian (陳水扁) yesterday announced belt-tightening measures and asked for public donations to sustain its daily operations until February after a recent amendment revoked Chen’s perks as a former head of state.

Chen Sung-shan (陳淞山), manager of Chen’s office, said it would continue to operate despite the financial difficulty. To sustain the NT$540,000 (US$16,800) monthly expenses, he said the office would implement austerity measures to cut costs.