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Taiwan Tati Cultural and Educational Foundation

DPP needs coherent policies to win

With exactly a month to go before the Dec. 5 three-in-one local government and township elections, the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) launched its campaign on Wednesday, calling on voters to punish the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) government for its poor performance.

After almost two years in the wilderness following the DPP’s crushing defeats in legislative and presidential elections, and the ongoing struggle to contain the fallout from former president Chen Shui-bian’s (陳水扁) saga, the DPP seems confident that now is a good time to start its comeback.

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Ma’s covenant of political silence

It was reported a few days ago that President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九), who is also chairman of the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT), declared that “covenants” would be drawn up for the party’s legislators-at-large to keep their political statements in line with party policy.

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Can ECFA negotiations be trusted?

The government’s atrocious handling of the expansion of US beef imports — opaque, peremptory and confused, regardless of the merits of the products — is becoming a real cause for concern in terms of the bigger picture: cross-strait detente, and particularly a proposed economic pact with China.

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The PRC’s malign currency policy

Over the last several weeks, the US dollar’s depreciation against the euro and yen has grabbed global attention. In a normal world, the dollar’s weakening would be welcome, as it would help the US come to grips with its unsustainable trade deficit. But in a world where China links its currency to the dollar at an undervalued parity, the dollar’s depreciation risks major global economic damage that will further complicate recovery from the worldwide recession.

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Accountability is issue in Taiwan-U.S. beef flap

Yesterday's consensus among all parties in the Legislative Yuan to rapidly approve a legal ban on the importation of beef products with especially high risk of contamination of "mad cow disease" sent an important message to President Ma Ying-jeou's Chinese Nationalist Party (Kuomintang) government and decision-makers in Washington and Beijing that voices of the Taiwan people cannot be ignored.

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Death will not silence the protests

If China hopes to quell unrest in Xinjiang by kidnapping, jailing or even executing scores of Uighurs, the results will fall short. Decades of oppression — economic, cultural, religious and linguistic — have at times welled into protests or riots in China’s biggest territory, as seen again this summer. Clamping down further on the region, history tells us, is more likely to fuel unrest than squash it.

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2015-12-26 Taiwanese Shrine Initation & Marytr-Spirit Enshrine Ceremony
2014-02-28 228 Tâi-uân-sîn(Taiwan gods) Thanksgiving Blessing Assembly and Trong R. Chai Tâi-uân-sîn Thanksgiving Praying Ceremony
2013-08-18 Holy Mountain Holiness Birthday and Tâi-uân-sîn Lin Mao-sheng Statue's Placement Ceremony
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Newsflash

Lobsang Sangay, a 43-year-old Harvard scholar, took office yesterday as head of the Tibetan government-in-exile, vowing to free his homeland from Chinese “colonialism.”

After being sworn in at a colorful ceremony in the Indian hill town of Dharamsala, Sangay warned China that the Tibet movement was “here to stay” and would only grow stronger in the waning years of the Dalai Lama.

In an historic shift from the dominance of Tibetan politics by religious figures, the new prime minister, who has never set foot in Tibet, is assuming the political leadership role relinquished by the 76-year-old Dalai Lama in May.