Taiwan Tati Cultural and Educational Foundation

 
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Taiwan Tati Cultural and Educational Foundation

Balancing US, PRC comfort zones

When Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) was elected president, the immediate US reaction was to heave a sigh of relief because Ma’s pro-­China policies were expected to relax the tense cross-strait relationship. In practice, things have turned out slightly differently, as “pro-China” became “submit to China,” and this raised flags in the US, as can be seen from a series of recent events.

When the new director of the American Institute in Taiwan, William Stanton, visited Minister of Justice Wang Ching-feng (王清峰) on Sept. 30, he said that “people overseas had some different thoughts” on the trial of former president Chen Shui-bian (陳水扁). Why would he risk being accused of interfering with Taiwan’s internal affairs by bringing up this case? Clearly because the US now feels it is no longer a clear-cut judicial matter.

Read more...
 

Taiwan's core interests under PRC attack

Taiwan's 23 million people were send an explicit notice Wednesday of the "clear and present" threat posed to our hard-won democratic freedoms by the Chinese Communist Party-ruled People's Republic of China and facilitated by the China-centric right-wing Chinese Nationalist Party (Kuomintang) government under President Ma Ying-jeou.

Read more...
 

Putting the brakes on education

In a speech on Wednesday to the nation’s civil servants, Premier Wu Den-yih (吳敦義) said that maintaining sovereignty and ensuring the interests of Taiwanese remained the guiding principles of the government’s cross-strait policy.

“We should not do things that are not beneficial to the public. Those who execute cross-strait policies should act as gatekeepers when necessary and step on the brakes where necessary to maintain these principles,” the premier said.

Read more...
 

ECFA just a step to annexing Taiwan

After Taiwan and China sign an economic cooperation and framework agreement (ECFA), WTO regulations require that a free-trade agreement (FTA) be signed within 10 years.

In addition to tariff exemptions, an FTA requires the signatories to deregulate their service industries, including the retail, wholesale, food and beverage, tourism, hotel, entertainment, media, bank, insurance, communications, transport, health, education, consulting and brokerage industries. This could give rise to an influx of Chinese service industry manpower in Taiwan.

Read more...
 

Mining Taiwan's Darker History

HONG KONG — The story usually goes like this: China was taken over by Chairman Mao and became a brutal Communist state. Taiwan broke free and became a vibrant democracy. The ugliness of the last half-century — persecution, martial law, mass execution — happened on the mainland.

Read more...
 

More pandering to China

The first time the Dalai Lama wanted to visit after President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) took office, the Tibetan spiritual leader was turned down because it was not an “appropriate time for him to visit.” When World Uyghur Congress president and former political prisoner Rebiya Kadeer was invited to visit, the government said she was “linked to terrorists.”

Read more...
 
More Articles...
Page 641 of 677

We're 228 Followers

2015-12-26 Taiwanese Shrine Initation & Marytr-Spirit Enshrine Ceremony
2014-02-28 228 Tâi-uân-sîn(Taiwan gods) Thanksgiving Blessing Assembly and Trong R. Chai Tâi-uân-sîn Thanksgiving Praying Ceremony
2013-08-18 Holy Mountain Holiness Birthday and Tâi-uân-sîn Lin Mao-sheng Statue's Placement Ceremony
2013-02-28 228 Tâi-uân-sîn Thanksgiving Prayer Assembly - Realized the Determination of Founding Taiwan State with Democratic Power
228 Memorial and Bian Casters Gathering on Feb. 28th, 2010
We're @-Bian Casters for Taiwan

@-Bian Casters

Two CountriesFree A-bian!Taiwan, China

Show your support and write a letter to former President Chen Shui-bian.

Who's Online

We have 66 guests online

Statistics

Content View Hits : 1955570

Newsflash

Ngawang Norphel and Tenzin Khedup raise Tibetan national flags as flames rise from their bodies. Zatoe, Keygudo June 20, 2012.

DHARAMSHALA, May 24: A new report on China has painted a grim picture of the world’s most populous country’s human rights record and revealed that Chinese authorities in Tibet continue to repress the fundamental rights of the Tibetan people.

Global rights watchdog, Amnesty International, in its Annual Report 2013 on the State of the World's Human Rights released Thursday said Chinese authorities maintained a “stranglehold on political activists, human rights defenders and online activists, subjecting many to harassment, intimidation, arbitrary detention and enforced disappearance.”